05 July 2009

Siege at Boston

I found this chapter a bit harder to get into, but I think I've finally made it.

There's a siege at Boston. George Washington was there, trying to whip the soldier into shape so they would not only be a useful fighting force, but also they'd stop getting so sick. Sounds like conditions were terrible in part because folks weren't being at all careful about where they went to the bathroom. Gross. Already folks are dieing, in large part because they are not keeping clean, as mostly they have enough food still at this point.

I think that the most interesting bit from the whole chapter was how King George, by saying the colonies were in rebellion, convinced them - the colonists - of that fact. Prior to that point, even General Washington himself was hoping for reconciliation and a quick end to the conflict. This was news to me, and I find it amazing. Take home lesson from this seems to be: watch what you say! It's still 7 years from the point that Britain recognizes America's independence, but that speech proved to be a turning point in that news of it caused the Americans to make up their minds, en masse.

4 comments:

misskate said...

Yeah, I think you're right. King George jumping to conclusions gave those in America crazy ideas and added an extra steam that may not have been there without that lynchpin.

I thought it was a little amusing (though not surprising really) that a speech given in October in England didn't reach the folks in the America's until January. Ah how communication speeds have changed :)

Ritsumei said...

Yeah, that is a bit different. Now, they've got the text of the speech to practically read along with the speaker! So much for ad-libs...

Becky said...

Is this the chapter where they set up on the hill in the middle of the night? I have read the first half of 1776 but need to finish. There are some real miracles cited by McCullough.

BTW, thanks for stopping by my blog and commenting on the Nephite temple drawing. Since it is partially in marker I can't make the suggested changes, but a friend gave me the idea of adding additional palm trees to the current picture. I think I will do that.

Ritsumei said...

No, this chapter is the one called, "Rabble in Arms" where they describe the rag-tag army under George Washington in late 1776.